21 Sep

Let’s talk about Diet

DietGoals

There are so many different diets out there and I bet you’ve tried at least one. They come in various shapes and sizes, with different goals and restrictions. Listed below are some diets that may or may not have been picked up by your radars.

1. Nutritarian Diet
The Nutritarian Diet was created by Dr. Joel Fuhrman and is governed by what is known as The Health Equation, and puts emphasis on maximizing the amount of micronutrients per calorie. A large portion of this diet is made up of low-calorie and nutrient-rich food, such as raw vegetables, which lessens the risk of developing chronic diseases and food addiction. The diet also endorses The Nutritarian food pyramid which serves as a guide for how much of each food type should be consumed.  For more information visit: https://www.drfuhrman.com/

2. GAPS Diet (Gut and Psychology Syndrome)
The GAPS diet, founded by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, establishes a connection between the digestive system and the brain. The main premise of the diet is that gut is responsible for the physiological and psychological problems that one goes through. The diet aims to heal one’s gut through an intense detoxification process and the consumption of nutrient dense, non-sugary and easy-to-digest food. For more information visit: https://www.gapsdiet.com/

3. Mediterranean Diet
The Mediterranean Diet is inspired by the conventional diet of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. The Mediterranean food pyramid is a simple guide for how food should be allocated in the diet. The diet lowers the risk of heart disease and consists of plenty of fruits and vegetables, legume and whole grains. It also endorses the consumption of fish and poultry while restricting the intake of meat and butter. This diet also requires one to
integrate some form of exercise into their lifestyle such as walking or Pilates.
For more information visit: http://www.mediterraneandiet.com/
http://oldwayspt.org/resources/heritage-pyramids/mediterranean-diet-pyramid

4. DASH Diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension)
The DASH Diet focuses on lowering one’s blood pressure and cholesterol without the use of medicine. The food consumed in this diet should be high in fiber and low in fat. It puts importance on the consumption of whole grains, nuts, beans, fish, poultry and lean meat. It is a flexible diet which emphasizes maintaining a healthy weight. For more information visit: http://dashdiet.org/

5. TLC Diet (Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes)
The TLC diet is one that is not meant for weight loss; instead it focuses on maintaining one’s ideal weight and at the same time lowers the risk of heart disease. Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products are what make up a large portion of this diet. It restricts the amount of saturated fat that one consumes and highlights the importance of knowing what you are eating.  For more information visit: http://tlcdiet.org/

6. Mayo Clinic Diet
The Mayo Clinic Diet claims to be a weight loss program for life. It allows one to lose weight and eventually make the diet a lifestyle. As it is governed by the Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Pyramid, one is able to see the balance of eating healthy and exercising. The diet focuses on teaching you how to improve eating habits, make healthier food as well as lifestyle choices.  For more information visit: http://www.mayoclinic.org/

7. Ornish Diet
The Ornish Diet uses nutrition, exercise, stress and emotional management guides to achieve various goals. This diet created by Dr. Dean Ornish can be used for weight loss, the prevention of diabetes and heart disease, and lowering cholesterol and blood pressure. The diet not only categorizes food from healthful to least healthful but also puts emphasis on exercise. There is a wide range of exercises and activities suggested in this diet such as
aerobics and meditation. Ultimately it is up to the individual to create a combination that they will be able to sustain long-term. For more information visit: http://ornishspectrum.com/

8. Flexitarian Diet
The word flexitarian is a portmanteau of flexible and vegetarian created by Dawn Jackson Blanter. The whole premise of the diet is to lessen the amount of meat you consume and add five “new” food groups to the normal diet. There is a wide range of options presented in this diet, and by lessening the consumption of meat it lowers the risk of heart disease, diabetes and cancer. For more information visit: http://dawnjacksonblatner.com/

9. Abs Diet
The Abs diet is a no calorie counting and metabolism boosting program created by David Zinczenko. This diet puts a lot of emphasis on exercise as one needs to undergo ab work outs twice a week, strength training three times a week plus additional cardio. To keep energy levels at a maximum, one consumes six meals a day. This diet revolves around the 12 Abs Diet Powerfoods and each meal must contain at least two items from this list. This diet restrains one from eating saturated and trans fats, high-fructose corn syrup, and refined carbs and instead suggests the consumption of more protein, calcium, and fiber.
For more information visit: http://www.absdiet.com/

10. Vegan Diet
A Vegan diet is stripped of all animal-products including meat, seafood, poultry, eggs and dairy. This diet reduces the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease. It is mainly composed of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes. It is a complete change in lifestyle and requires careful planning in the beginning to ensure that one receives all the essential vitamins and nutrients. For more information visit: http://www.vegweb.com/

Disclaimer: The material above was written for informational purposes only. As with any lifestyle change and/or dietary intervention it is important to do further research and consult with one’s doctor before pursuing said change.

Do you know any other diet that we can add on our list?

Contributor/Writer: Kristianne Untal

14 Sep

A First Look at Wholefood

Whole food remedy for a healthy  you

 

A First Look at Wholefood
By Kristianne Untal

The world today revolves around giving us quick and easy access to almost everything. Because of this, industries have worked to provide us with commodities which satisfy the market’s demand. As a result we are now surrounded by processed and manufactured food which may have been stripped of their prime nutritional value. They come in cans, jars and vacuum-packed containers, but surprisingly this doesn’t only pertain to meat, fish and other sources of protein. Nowadays even fruits and vegetables are being processed before they reach our supermarkets.

I think everyone would agree that they would like to have optimal health and despite there being no magic elixir to provide us with this, there are choices we can make to bring us closer to that ideal. Consuming wholefood is one of those options which we can have without sacrificing the quick and easy routine, as this can be consumed with minor or even no cooking involved. But wait, what exactly is wholefood?

Wholefood (n.) food that has been processed or refined as little as possible and is free from additives or other artificial substances; natural or organic food

Wholefood is organically produced and is prepared without chemicals and processed additives. It is usually associated with vegetables, fruits, legumes and grains however it also includes organically grown meat products. Consuming such has demonstrated to be beneficial in many aspects. It contains more vitamins, minerals and other nutrients, as compared to the processed food found in most grocery stores. They are a good source of phytochemicals which prevent the occurrence of chronic diseases and at the same time serve as antioxidants.

Incorporating wholefood into one’s diet has also proved to reduce the risk and development of arthritis, cancer, type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Eating a high amount of raw fruits and vegetables improves blood pressure and increases one’s metabolism. The body also absorbs the nutrients from these fares faster because there are no preservatives or artificial additives to slow down the natural processes which our body undergoes.

It is important to remember that everything we consume affects our bodies in some way. In both the long and short run, consuming artery clogging, low-fiber, and sugar loaded food will not benefit us at all. Although shifting to wholefood may seem or actually be difficult at the start, even the smallest integration of it into our diets can make a difference in our lives.

“It is in our small actions toward change where we find great strides in improvement.”